DANCE

Keara Wilson receives copyright for viral #savagechallenge dance

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In March 2020, Keara Wilson created a dance to the song “Savage” by Megan Thee Stallion. The dance went viral and the #SavageChallenge was created, with many users on TikTok trying the moves themselves to post on the social media platform. This included celebrities such as Keke Palmer, Jennifer Lopez, Justin Bieber and Megan Thee Stallion herself.

It took an hour to create the dance, but once it took off, Wilson started making a living as a TikToker.

Recently, at the end of July, Keara Wilson was honoured at a dinner where choreographer JaQuel Knight and Logitech partnered up to recognise BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Colour) creators.

They began by helping 11 creators, including Keara Wilson, to start the process of copyrighting their choreography through a method of labanotation, which documents dance steps with symbols in specific patterns.

Wilson is among the first six creators to have her steps approved. Check out her Instagram post with JaQuel Knight where they do the dance together during the dinner hosted in late July: https://www.instagram.com/p/CR9znQJHYhD/.

With the “Savage” dance now copyrighted, Wilson will receive credit whenever the dance is used. If it appears in a film or video game, then she will be able to claim payment. If she is not credited, then she can also take legal action.

This is a big step for BIPOC creators who have claimed that social media platforms, such as TikTok, are not fair and can be discriminating. By receiving copyright, BIPOC users will now be able to regain their power by ensuring they receive the correct credits and payments for their hard work.

There have been many times when BIPOC creators did not receive proper credit for their content. Two popular creators on TikTok, Charli D’Amelio and Addison Rae Easterling, gained millions of followers by following dances choreographed by Black creators. Many of these Black creators protested on the app in order to get recognition for their own work.

Now that BIPOC creators are beginning to take steps to claim their work officially, recognition will also increase for those creators who drive the app by bringing in culture and trends, which ends up on everyone’s TikTok For You page.

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